lasagnanipples:

I think you mean panoramas done right


John Lennon in the jacket that was supposedly the inspiration for the Sgt. Pepper’s look. 1967.

John Lennon in the jacket that was supposedly the inspiration for the Sgt. Pepper’s look. 1967.

drinkmasturbatecry:

nudityandnerdery:

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

they need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay
“He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”
"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”
"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”
"It looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”
"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

And, of course: "The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t."

the one that will always stay with me is “Arthur Dent was grappling with his consciousness the way one grapples with a lost bar of soap in the bath,” i feel like that was the first time i really understood what you could do with words.

drinkmasturbatecry:

nudityandnerdery:

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

they need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay

He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”

"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”

"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”

"It looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”

"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

And, of course:

"The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t."

the one that will always stay with me is “Arthur Dent was grappling with his consciousness the way one grapples with a lost bar of soap in the bath,” i feel like that was the first time i really understood what you could do with words.

heyfunniest:

Things to know for no reason. 

kewkitty:

Kitty does not know what to do with the butterfly that landed on its paw.

kewkitty:

Kitty does not know what to do with the butterfly that landed on its paw.

agelfeygelach:

armouredswampert:

agelfeygelach:

little-yogi:

It’s a cute little thing though.

Sometimes it is hard to remember that owls are incredibly dangerous predators seen by cultures throughout  the world as ill omens. Especially when they look like toasted marshmallows.

My boss once described them as flying pillows filled with seething hatred.

Further confirming that owls are the avian equivalent of cats.

fadewithfury:

Opening a story file to work on it after not touching it for months.

image

foodtrucker:

i don;t even know why i stay up late all i do is find new ways to hate myself

williamshatnerds:

capecod-arabella:

truthed:

so many concerts, not enough money

so many concerts, wrong country

so many concerts, wrong decade.

thateventuality:

George Harrison and Eric Idle

"When they told me that they were going to induct my friend George Harrison into the Hollywood Bowl Hall Of Fame posthumously my first thought was, ‘I bet he won’t show up.’ Because, unlike some others one might mention - but won’t - he really wasn’t into honours. He was one of those odd people who believe that life is somehow more important than show business. Which I know is heresay here in Hollywood, and I’m sorry to bring it up here in the very bowel of the Hollywood but I can hear his voice saying, ‘Oh, very nice, very useful, a posthumous award - where am I supposed to put it? What’s next for me then? A posthumous Grammy? An ex-knighthood? An After-Life Achievement Award?’ He’s going to need a whole new shelf up there.
I think he would prefer to be inducted posthumorously because he loved comedians - poor, sick, sad, deranged, loveable puppoes that we are - because they, like him, had the ability to say the wrong thing at the right time, which is what we call humour.
He put ‘Monty Python’ on here at the Hollywood Bowl and he paid for the movie ‘The Life Of Brian,’ because he wanted to see it. Still the most anybody has ever paid for a cinema ticket!
What made George special, apart from his being the best guitarist in the Beatles, was what he did with his life after they achieved everything. He realised that this fame business was, and I’ll use the technical philosophical term here, complete bullshit. And he turned to find beauty and truth and meaning in life and - more extraordinarily - found it.
Michael Palin said George’s passing was really sad but it does make the afterlike seem much more attractive. He was a gardener - he grew beauty in everything he did - in his life, in his music, in his marriage and as a father. I was on an island somewhere when a man came up to him and said, ‘George Harrison, oh my God, what are you doing here?’ and he said, ‘Well, everyone’s got to be somewhere.’
Well, alas, he isn’t here. But we are. And that’s the point. This isn’t for him. This is for us, because we want to honour him. We want to remember him, we want to say, ‘thanks, George’ for being. And we really miss you.” - Eric Idle’s speech marking the induction of George Harrison into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame, 28 June 2002

thateventuality:

George Harrison and Eric Idle

"When they told me that they were going to induct my friend George Harrison into the Hollywood Bowl Hall Of Fame posthumously my first thought was, ‘I bet he won’t show up.’ Because, unlike some others one might mention - but won’t - he really wasn’t into honours. He was one of those odd people who believe that life is somehow more important than show business. Which I know is heresay here in Hollywood, and I’m sorry to bring it up here in the very bowel of the Hollywood but I can hear his voice saying, ‘Oh, very nice, very useful, a posthumous award - where am I supposed to put it? What’s next for me then? A posthumous Grammy? An ex-knighthood? An After-Life Achievement Award?’ He’s going to need a whole new shelf up there.

I think he would prefer to be inducted posthumorously because he loved comedians - poor, sick, sad, deranged, loveable puppoes that we are - because they, like him, had the ability to say the wrong thing at the right time, which is what we call humour.

He put ‘Monty Python’ on here at the Hollywood Bowl and he paid for the movie ‘The Life Of Brian,’ because he wanted to see it. Still the most anybody has ever paid for a cinema ticket!

What made George special, apart from his being the best guitarist in the Beatles, was what he did with his life after they achieved everything. He realised that this fame business was, and I’ll use the technical philosophical term here, complete bullshit. And he turned to find beauty and truth and meaning in life and - more extraordinarily - found it.

Michael Palin said George’s passing was really sad but it does make the afterlike seem much more attractive. He was a gardener - he grew beauty in everything he did - in his life, in his music, in his marriage and as a father. I was on an island somewhere when a man came up to him and said, ‘George Harrison, oh my God, what are you doing here?’ and he said, ‘Well, everyone’s got to be somewhere.’

Well, alas, he isn’t here. But we are. And that’s the point. This isn’t for him. This is for us, because we want to honour him. We want to remember him, we want to say, ‘thanks, George’ for being. And we really miss you.” - Eric Idle’s speech marking the induction of George Harrison into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame, 28 June 2002